Category Archives: Marijuana legalization

Study: Fewer Arizona teens smoking pot since medical marijuana legalization

Fewer Arizona teens are trying marijuana since the state legalized the drug for medical uses, a study published recently by the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission revealed.

In all, the study (PDF) found that 28.7 percent of students surveyed by the commission admitted to using marijuana at least once. The figure represents a minor drop from 29.9 percent in 2010.

Medical marijuana legalization took effect in Arizona in 2011.

Atlanta Progressive News Reports on C.A.R.E. Project

MATTHEW CHARLES CARDINALE of Atlanta Progressive News reports on the launch of Georgia C.A.R.E. Project. Be sure to subscribe to their news service and send a news tip.

Activists to Push Legislature for Medical Marijuana in Georgia

“If they can decriminalize crimes such as theft, burglary, and forgery–they did enact legislation to drop the penalties–then certainly they can look at marijuana laws and lower the penalties for that,” Bell said.

“Decriminalize it, medicalize it, I’m open to almost any form of reform,” Bell said.

Bell said he wants the Legislature in 2013 to create a special committee to study the issues of marijuana law reform, to report back for action during the Legislative Session in 2014.

“A person who smokes marijuana does not commit a crime against another person, it’s a victimless crime.  It’s a crime against the government,” Bell said.

My FOX Atlanta – All News 106.7 talks legalization

Should you go to prison if you smoke pot in Georgia?  One group argues emphatically that you should not.  A campaign to decriminalize marijuana in Georgia was launched Monday at the State Capitol.

All News 106.7‘s Connie Cummings reports that the Georgia Campaign for Access, Reform and Education (CARE) held news conference to urge state lawmakers to include reforming Georgia’s marijuana laws as they reform the criminal justice system.  One member of that group, James Bell, says the state effort to stop filling prisons with non-violent offenders should include marijuana laws.

GSU Students for Sensible Drug Policy joins campaign

Atlanta, GA — Members of Students for Sensible Drug Policy at Georgia State University announce support for Georgia’s newest Marijuana Law Reform efforts. Students will stand in solidarity with fellow Georgia marijuana law reformers at the Capitol this Monday during the unveiling of the GA C.A.R.E. Project.

The Georgia Campaign for Access, Reform & Education or GA C.A.R.E. Project, will host a press conference at the Georgia state capitol Monday, December 17 – 11am to announce the campaign’s mission.

Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP) is an international grassroots network of students who educate their peers, parents, and policymakers about how the drug war has failed our generation and our society. SSDP mobilizes and empowers young people to participate in the political process, pushing for sensible policies to achieve a safer and more just future, while fighting back against counterproductive drug war policies, particularly those that directly harm students and youth.

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NORML Joins C.A.R.E. Project

The local chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (Peachtree NORML) has joined the coalition of groups pushing marijuana law reform in Georgia.

Peachtree NORML and Georgia Moms for Marijuana are proud to announce that we will be joining with other marijuana reform groups in Georgia to begin the conversation of law reform and help to educate the voting public.  We will join a press conference at the Georgia State capitol Monday, December 17th – 11AM to announce the campaign’s mission.

Sharon Ravert, Executive Director of Peachtree NORML and Public Relations Officer of Moms for Marijuana International, said “It is time to talk. We need to look at the dangers and harms that we have caused to our family structure in our efforts to keep drugs out of our communities.  Now is the time to work together to reform our laws.   Prohibition didn’t work before and is not working now; it has accomplished no notable positives. Mothers and fathers are talking about this at their dinner tables; it is time to talk about it in our State house.  Parents are beginning to see that drug laws are more harmful than marijuana ever has been or ever could be.” Continue reading